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Ragout of Lamb

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sheila
Senior Member
Username: sheila

Post Number: 6406
Registered: 10-2002

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 5:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)


* Exported from MasterCook *

RAGOUT OF LAMB, with Provençal rosé wine, tomatoes and flageolets

Recipe By : Rick Stein
Serving Size : 4


Ingredients

225 g flageolet beans -- soaked overnight in plenty of cold water
2 kg shoulder of lamb
3 tbsps olive oil
2 med onions -- chopped
5 garlic cloves -- finely chopped
1 Tbsp tomato purée
500 g vine ripened tomatoes -- skinned and roughly chopped
2 tbsps plain flour
300 ml rosé wine
600 ml chicken stock -- fresh or cube
bouguet garni -- made from thyme sprigs and bay leaves tied with string
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

For the persillade:
2 cloves of garlic
large handful of flat-leaf parsley leaves

Served with
400 g cooked tubetti pasta -- tossed with a little butter, to serve

Drain the beans, put them into a pan and cover with plenty of fresh water. Bring to the boil, skimming off any scum as it rises to the surface, and leave to simmer until the beans are tender. This could take anywhere between 45 minutes and 1½ hours, depending on the age of your beans. Drain cover and set aside.

Bone out of the shoulder lamb and trim away all the excess fat and the skin from the meat. Cut it into 5-6-cm chunks and season with salt and pepper.

Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil in a large flameproof casserole. Add half the lamb and fry over a medium-high heat until nicely browned on all sides. Lift onto a plate and repeat with the rest of the lamb.

Add the remaining olive oil, onions and garlic to the casserole and fry until lightly golden. Add the tomato purée and tomatoes and fry for 2 minutes. Stir in the flour and cook for 1-2 minutes, then return the lamb to the pan, pour over the wine and bring to the boil. Simmer rapidly until the wine has reduced by half.

Pour over enough stock to barely cover the meat and add the bouquet garni, 1 teaspoon of sea salt and 20 turns of black pepper. Part cover with a lid and simmer very gently for 1 hour or until the lamb is tender and the sauce has reduced and thickened.

Add the cooked flageolet beans and simmer uncovered for a further 5-10 minutes until the beans have heated through. Adjust the seasoning if necessary.

For the persillade, crush the garlic cloves on a board add the parsley leaves and chop together finely. Sprinkle this over the ragout and serve at the table with the cooked tubetti pasta.


MY NOTES : I used a tin of flageolet beans. I also feel you could use any meat of this recipe not necessarily lamb.





(Message edited by sheila on October 31, 2005)
Sheila &




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diana
Senior Member
Username: diana

Post Number: 413
Registered: 9-2002

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 5:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Sheila. This looks really good.

(I noticed the * Exported from MasterCook * - clever stuff!!!)

Diana
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sheila
Senior Member
Username: sheila

Post Number: 6407
Registered: 10-2002

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Votes: 0 (Vote!)

Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 5:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Diana, I am feeling quite proud of myself. I have had MC for a couple of years and one look at it and I was terrified!LOL :-) Lynn has come to my rescue and now I am beginning to see and understand how it works. I exported this recipe this morning first time that is a first, I can tell you!:-):-)
Sheila &




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jacqui
Senior Member
Username: jacqui

Post Number: 14387
Registered: 12-2001

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 8:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wonder if baby limas or navy beans would be the best substitute as flageolets are not available in my town. Do you think using the rosé is any better than using red?
J
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sheila
Senior Member
Username: sheila

Post Number: 6410
Registered: 10-2002

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 8:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think red would do just as well Jacqui, and your choice of bean should work. Flageolets are small, I would say just slightly smaller in size to a baked bean.
Sheila &




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jacqui
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Username: jacqui

Post Number: 14389
Registered: 12-2001

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 9:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That helps - will use the navy pea beans then.
J
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sheila
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Username: sheila

Post Number: 6412
Registered: 10-2002

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Posted on Monday, October 31, 2005 - 10:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Jacqui, I am sticking my oar in!

I think that all red wine may be a little too strong and create a very rich flavour like Coq au Vin or Beef burn-in-a-bucket. Either white or red + white I think would give a softer flavour.

Les

PS It really was very good, might suggest a big pile of garlic bread instead of pasta to use as a culinary mop.
Sheila &




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